Tyson adds 225 tons of chicken to its existing recall; Listeria illnesses reported

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Emma Hayes

There I was in a hot yoga studio with plenty of bright natural light and bending myself into pretzel like positions for the very first time.

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Tyson Foods Inc. has added more than 450,000 pounds of chicken products to its existing recall of 8.5 million pounds because additional date codes have been identified.

“Details of this recall were updated to reflect additional date codes and an increase in product poundage from approximately 8,492,832 pounds to approximately 8,955,296 pounds. The recalled product names and product codes remain the same. While the product was distributed to schools, it resulted from a commercial sale and was not part of food provided by the USDA for the National School Lunch Program,” according to the updated recall notice posted by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

The frozen, fully cooked chicken products were produced between December 26, 2020 and April 13, 2021. The products that are subject to recall are listed here. View the labels here.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-7089” on the product bag or inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped nationwide to retailers and institutions, including hospitals, nursing facilities, restaurants, schools and Department of Defense locations, according to the FSIS recall notice.

An outbreak related to the recall includes two Listeria monocytogenes illnesses in Texas and one in Delaware with one death.

Tyson’s Dexter, MO, unit recalled almost 8,5 million pounds of ready-to-eat (RTE) chicken products because of those illnesses. See the complete list of recalled products, including product and date codes, on the USDA-FSIS website.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta advises people not to eat, sell, or serve recalled products.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from April 6, 2021, to June 5, 2021. Sick people range in age from 60 to 95 years, with a median age of 89, and 66 percent are male. All three people were hospitalized, and one death reported is from Texas.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, according to the CDC, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. All three people were in a long-term care facility or hospital when they got sick. These facilities served many food items, including meals with precooked chicken.

About Listeria infections

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any recalled products and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop.

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses.

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.



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author

Emma Hayes

There I was in a hot yoga studio with plenty of bright natural light and bending myself into pretzel like positions for the very first time.

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